Pros and Cons of Uninsured Motorist Coverage

This question is about Uninsured Motorist Coverage Guide Contents WalletHub, Financial Company Why You Should Get Uninsured Motorist Coverage in FloridaKey Facts About Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida:People also askTypes of Underinsured Motorist CoverageWhen To Have Uninsured Motorist CoverageWhat Happens If You Reject Uninsured Motorist Coverage?Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury CoverageUninsured Motorist Property Damage CoverageFAQsDo I…



This question is about Uninsured Motorist Coverage Guide

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No, uninsured motorist coverage is not required in Florida, as drivers can reject the coverage in writing. Still, insurance companies are required to offer at least $10,000 in uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per person (up to $20,000 per accident).

For Florida drivers who do not opt out by rejecting the coverage in writing, uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage helps pay for a car accident in which the other driver doesn’t have car insurance, or doesn’t have enough coverage for the damage they caused.

Why You Should Get Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida

Normally, an at-fault driver’s insurance helps pay for any damage after an accident. However, if the other driver doesn’t have any – or enough – coverage, it can be time-consuming and difficult to sue them for funds to cover any medical or repair bills. That’s where this optional insurance coverage can help you save time and money.

Even though Florida does not require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, you should still consider buying it. In Florida, an average of 27% of drivers on the road don’t have car insurance, which means there is a 1 in 4 chance that the other driver won’t have coverage if you get into an accident. Car accidents in Florida can be very expensive, too.

Key Facts About Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida:

  • Minimum Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury: $10,000 per person and up to $20,000 per accident
  • Uninsured Drivers on the Road: 27%
  • Crashes per Year: 403,626
  • Odds of a Crash with an Uninsured Driver: 1 in 4

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People also ask

Do I need uninsured motorist coverage if I have collision and comprehensive?

Yes, you need uninsured motorist coverage even if you have collision and comprehensive coverage. Collision insurance will pay to repair your vehicle if you’re hit by an uninsured driver, but it won’t pay for any of your medical expenses, and comprehensive insurance won’t cover your costs at all after a collision. Comprehensive insurance only pays for repairs if your car is damaged by something other than a collision, such as vandalism or a natural disaster. And you would need uninsured motorist coverage, read full answerpersonal injury protection (PIP) or MedPay to cover your medical expenses after a collision with an uninsured driver.

Types of Underinsured Motorist Coverage

There are two types of uninsured motorist coverage: bodily injury (UMBI) and property damage (UMPD). UMBI pays for your medical expenses after an accident caused by an uninsured motorist, while UMPD pays to repair or replace your car.

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia require drivers to carry some type of uninsured motorist coverage. Some states like North Carolina and West Virginia require drivers to carry both types, while others like New York and Oregon only require uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage. And in some other states, insurance companies don’t offer uninsured motorist property damage coverage at all.

When To Have Uninsured Motorist Coverage

Since collision and comprehensive coverage don’t cover medical expenses after an accident, you should carry uninsured motorist bodily injury insurance even if it’s not required in your state. The exception to this would be if you already carry personal injury protection or MedPay, which pay for your medical bills in accidents regardless of fault or if the other driver is uninsured.

If uninsured motorist property damage coverage isn’t available in your state or you’re not required to carry it, then you can purchase collision insurance instead. Unlike UMPD, collision insurance will cover repairs even if you were at fault, which gives you a wider safety net. However, UMPD is usually less expensive than collision insurance and carries a lower deductible.

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What is the cost of uninsured motorist coverage?

Uninsured motorist coverage costs around $50-$75 annually for bodily injury and property damage coverage. Uninsured motorist coverage (UM) protects the policyholder by paying for injuries or damage resulting from a car accident caused by a driver who doesn’t have enough insurance.

Like any type of car insurance, uninsured motorist premiums vary based on the policyholder’s risk factors. How much coverage you purchase will also affect the cost of UM. Similarly, uninsured motorist premiums are higher in states with more uninsured drivers because of the additional risk.read full answer

Even if uninsured motorist coverage is not required in your state, it is an inexpensive coverage option that might be worth it depending on your circumstances.

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Should I reject uninsured motorist coverage?

No, you should not reject uninsured motorist coverage unless you have collision insurance and enough medical coverage to pay for your expenses after an accident caused by an uninsured driver. Drivers can reject uninsured motorist coverage in states where it is optional but still has to be offered by insurance companies. For instance, drivers in California, Florida, and Texas can legally reject uninsured motorist coverage. In 21 other states, including New York and Illinois, uninsured motorist coverage is required, so drivers cannot reject it. read full answer

Uninsured motorist (UM) coverage is still a good investment even if it’s not mandatory in your state. The price of UM varies based on each driver’s risk factors, but it averages around $50-$75 annually. Given that an estimated 1 in 8 drivers in the U.S. is uninsured, this coverage is an inexpensive way to protect yourself financially.

Uninsured motorist insurance is divided into two categories, bodily injury and property damage. Both kinds of UM insurance are designed to replace the liability coverage that an at-fault driver should have purchased. Covered drivers can file a claim with their own policy if they are in a crash caused by someone without liability insurance. Depending on the state and the policy, drivers might also purchase underinsured motorist (UIM) coverage, which can be used when the at-fault driver’s liability insurance is insufficient.

What Happens If You Reject Uninsured Motorist Coverage?

If you reject uninsured motorist coverage, you will need to use another type of coverage or pay out of pocket in the event that you are hit by an uninsured driver. If you already have collision insurance and medical coverage of some sort, rejecting uninsured motorist coverage might be a good way to lower your premium. Otherwise, paying for uninsured motorist coverage is generally an inexpensive way to add extra protection.

Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury Coverage

Uninsured motorist bodily injury (UMBI) coverage is advisable for drivers who do not have personal injury protection (PIP) or MedPay insurance with high limits. PIP and MedPay cover medical expenses regardless of fault, so drivers with plenty of PIP or MedPay might not need UMBI.

However, keep in mind that the average uninsured motorist bodily injury claim was $32,337 in 2016, the latest year with data. So a few thousand dollars of PIP will not cover you for a serious accident with an uninsured driver. Similarly, UMBI requires you to pay fewer out-of-pocket expenses than general health insurance when you need to pay for medical bills after a qualifying accident.

Uninsured Motorist Property Damage Coverage

Uninsured motorist property damage (UMPD) coverage is only available in some states. UMPD is less important than the bodily injury variation for most drivers, since it overlaps entirely with collision insurance.

The main advantage that UMPD has over collision insurance is that it usually has lower premiums, since it covers fewer situations. UMPD could also be a worthwhile purchase if you don’t want your collision premium to increase in the event of a claim after an accident with an uninsured driver.

For more information and to see if UM is required in your state, check out WalletHub’s guide to uninsured motorist coverage.

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FAQs

Do I really need uninsured motorist coverage in Florida?

Drivers in Florida are not required to have either underinsured or uninsured motorist coverage. This coverage is simply a way to ensure a driver can best be prepared to handle the financial fallout of an accident in the event the other driver either has no insurance or not enough

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Do I need uninsured motorist coverage in Florida if I have PIP?

All drivers in Florida are required by law to carry PIP coverage, but UM/UIM coverage is optional. Just because accident insurance is mandatory under law does not mean that everyone will have it, though, and unfortunately, Florida has one of the highest rates of uninsured drivers in the nation

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What does uninsured motorist cover in the state of Florida?

Uninsured motorist coverage in Florida covers you if you suffer damages inflicted by a driver who was driving without insurance or who had too little insurance. Generally, the same insurance policies also protect you if the responsible motorist was underinsured rather than completely uninsured

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How much liability insurance do I need for my car in Florida?

Unlike other states, Florida car insurance requirements do not include bodily injury coverage. Instead, drivers in the state need to have at least $10,000 for personal injury protection (PIP) and $10,000 for property damage liability.

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Why are there so many uninsured drivers in Florida?

The main reason many Floridians don’t have car insurance, however, is poverty. The FlaglerLive article cites Insurance Information Institute (III) statistics in making its point that many drivers in Florida simply cannot afford car insurance.

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Does uninsured motorist cover property damage in Florida?

Uninsured Motorist (UM) Insurance Fully Protects Drivers

The low amounts of PIP and property damage insurance required by Florida law can quickly be eaten up by medical and repair bills after even a minor crash.

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What bodily injury coverage do I need in Florida?

be insured with PIP and PDL insurance at the time of vehicle registration. have a minimum of $10,000 in PIP AND a minimum of $10,000 in PDL. Vehicles registered as taxis must carry bodily injury liability (BIL) coverage of $125,000 per person, $250,000 per occurrence and $50,000 for (PDL) coverage.

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What happens if you don’t have enough insurance to cover an accident in Florida?

Drivers who don’t carry the required coverage may be subject to paying for damage to your vehicle and medical bills due to injuries, as well as face criminal consequences for failing to carry insurance while driving. The state may revoke or suspend their driver’s license.

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Will my insurance go up if someone hits me Florida?

Per Florida Statutes §626.9541, your car insurance should not go up after an accident unless you were ?substantially at fault.? The statute states that insurers cannot raise liability, personal injury protection, medical payments, or collision premiums ?solely because the insured was involved in a motor vehicle …

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What happens if someone sues you for more than your insurance covers in Florida?

What happens if someone sues you for more than your insurance covers? If an injured person wins a lawsuit against you for an amount more than what your insurance covers, your insurance policy will still pay the amount of the liability policy limit toward satisfaction of the judgment.

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Who pays for car damage in a no-fault state Florida?

Florida No-Fault Car Insurance Laws

Florida is a no-fault state, which means each driver carries their own insurance to cover medical bills and car repairs up to a certain amount. More specifically,Florida Statutes § 627.736 requires drivers to carry PIP and property damage coverage policies of up to $10,000.

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Do you have to wait for police after car accident Florida?

The law requires notifying the police of an accident as soon as possible through the fastest means available. This often means calling the police from the scene of the crash.

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What happens if accident damage exceeds your car insurance in Florida?

In cases where a car accident victim’s damages (or amount of losses) are higher than the insurance policy limits, the defendant driver may be personally liable for the rest.

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Do you really need uninsured motorist coverage in Florida?

Do You Need Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida? This question is about Uninsured Motorist Coverage Guide WalletHub, Financial Company @WalletHub • 08/25/21 This answer was first published on 04/06/20 and it was last updated on 08/25/21.For the most current information about a financial product, you should always check and confirm accuracy with the offering financial institution. Editorial and user-generated content is not provided, reviewed or endorsed by any company. No, uninsured motorist coverage is not required in Florida, as drivers can reject the coverage in writing. Still, insurance companies are required to offer at least $10,000 in uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage per person (up to $20,000 per accident). For Florida drivers who do not opt out by rejecting the coverage in writing, uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage helps pay for a car accident in which the other driver doesn’t have car insurance, or doesn’t have enough coverage for the damage they caused. Why You Should Get Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida Normally, an at-fault driver’s insurance helps pay for any damage after an accident. However, if the other driver doesn’t have any – or enough – coverage, it can be time-consuming and difficult to sue them for funds to cover any medical or repair bills. That’s where this optional insurance coverage can help you save time and money. Even though Florida does not require uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage, you should still consider buying it. In Florida, an average of 27% of drivers on the road don’t have car insurance, which means there is a 1 in 4 chance that the other driver won’t have coverage if you get into an accident. Car accidents in Florida can be very expensive, too. Key Facts About Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida: Minimum Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury: $10,000 per person and up to $20,000 per accident Uninsured Drivers on the Road: 27% Crashes per Year: 403,626 Odds of a Crash with an Uninsured Driver: 1 in 4 Answer Question People also ask Do I need uninsured motorist coverage if I have collision and comprehensive? Yes, you need uninsured motorist coverage even if you have collision and comprehensive coverage. Collision insurance will pay to repair your vehicle if you’re hit by an uninsured driver, but it won’t pay for any of your medical expenses, and comprehensive insurance won’t cover your costs at all after a collision. Comprehensive insurance only pays for repairs if your car is damaged by something other than a collision, such as vandalism or a natural disaster. And you would need uninsured motorist coverage, … read full answerpersonal injury protection (PIP) or MedPay to cover your medical expenses after a collision with an uninsured driver.Types of Underinsured Motorist CoverageThere are two types of uninsured motorist coverage: bodily injury (UMBI) and property damage (UMPD). UMBI pays for your medical expenses after an accident caused by an uninsured motorist, while UMPD pays to repair or replace your car.Eighteen states and the District of Columbia require drivers to carry some type of uninsured motorist coverage. Some states like North Carolina and West Virginia require drivers to carry both types, while others like New York and Oregon only require uninsured motorist bodily injury coverage. And in some other states, insurance companies don’t offer uninsured motorist property damage coverage at all.When To Have Uninsured Motorist CoverageSince collision and comprehensive coverage don’t cover medical expenses after an accident, you should carry uninsured motorist bodily injury insurance even if it’s not required in your state. The exception to this would be if you already carry personal injury protection or MedPay, which pay for your medical bills in accidents regardless of fault or if the other driver is uninsured.If uninsured motorist property damage coverage isn’t available in your state or you’re not required to carry it, then you can purchase collision insurance…

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Do I need Uninsured Motorist Insurance in Florida? | Law Blog

Do I need Uninsured Motorist Insurance in Florida? In Florida, all drivers are required to carry a minimum amount of auto insurance. Specifically, they are required to carry at least $10,000 of property damage liability (PDL) and $10,000 of personal injury protection (PIP), also known as “Florida no-fault insurance”. Property damage liability pays for damage a driver causes to other people’s property after a vehicle crash, and personal injury protection pays a portion of an individual’s medical bills and lost wages if they are injured in an auto accident. Florida does not require motorists to carry bodily injury insurance or uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance. It is important to note that these are the minimum auto insurance requirements in Florida, and these requirements are much lower than the minimum requirements in most other states, and much lower than they should be. The majority of states require drivers to carry some type of bodily injury liability insurance in case they cause an accident with serious injuries and they are sued by other injured parties.  Bodily injury liability limits can be as low as $10,000 per person and $20,000 per accident and as high as $250,000 per person and $500,000 per accident or more. It all depends on state minimum requirements and the preferences of the policyholder. This type of insurance is there to protect your assets in the event that you cause an accident with serious injuries to others, and without it, your personal assets would be at risk in a lawsuit. If you carry just the bare minimum auto insurance requirements according to Florida law, your coverage is woefully inadequate. We all know that these days, $10,000 does not go very far to pay for the medical expenses and lost wages of someone who gets injured in an accident, and if the costs exceed this amount, you could be on the hook for additional damages if you do not have bodily injury liability coverage.  Do I Need to Have Uninsured Motorist Coverage? If you choose to have bodily injury liability coverage in your Florida auto insurance policy, you will also be offered uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance, usually with the same amount of coverage as you chose for bodily injury liability. Uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance covers you for losses in the event that you are injured in a car accident and the other driver does not have insurance, or the other driver does not have an adequate amount of insurance to cover your damages. Although you do not technically “need” uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance in Florida to be in compliance with state law, there are some very good reasons why you should choose this coverage: We are All at Risk for an Auto Accident Statistically, the average individual can expect to be involved in three or four auto accidents during their lifetime. In Florida, there were just under 400,000 motor vehicle accidents reported in 2018, resulting in more than 250,000 injuries and more than 3,000 fatalities. This puts Florida among the top 10 states in the nation for auto accidents. You may think it will never happen to you, and you may be the safest driver in the world. But you cannot control the actions of others, and you cannot control external factors. If you are ever involved in an accident, you want to make sure you have the proper level of insurance to cover both the injuries of others and yourself. Florida has a lot of Uninsured Drivers Although the law requires it, approximately one out of every four motorists in the Sunshine State is driving without insurance. This means that if you are in a car accident, there is a 25% chance that the other driver is not insured. If you are seriously injured in an accident with an uninsured driver and you do not have uninsured motorist coverage, it will be very difficult to recover compensation for your losses. If a driver does not have insurance, chances are they do not have any assets to speak of either. You could sue them, but you will most likely never see any of the damages you are awarded. Florida has a lot of Underinsured…

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Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida – Dolman Law Group

Pros and Cons of Uninsured Motorist CoverageNo one ever thinks they will be involved in a car accident. However, planning for one is always a good idea. Unfortunately, many drivers do not, and they continue to drive uninsured. As such, you need to protect yourself with uninsured motorist coverage. Do you know the pros and cons of uninsured motorist coverage?  Uninsured motorist insurance can cover damages caused by a negligent uninsured driver. With it, you can receive compensation for auto accident damages, such as medical expenses, lost wages, and property damage. However, not all drivers may think uninsured motorist coverage is for them. That’s why it’s essential to know the pros and cons of uninsured motorist coverage. How Do I Prepare for a Car Accident With Uninsured Motorists? Accidents happen, which is why uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage could help you out. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2019 there were nearly seven million police-reported crashes in the United States. Over the course of a typical driving lifetime, a driver can expect to be involved in three to four accidents. Even with statistics like this, it is still easy to think it will never happen to you. But as the old adage says, you should hope for the best but prepare for the worst. Florida uninsured motorist coverage can help you do this.  There are various ways a driver can prepare for a car accident, including planning their route ahead of time, practicing safe driving habits, and staying alert while behind the wheel. Unfortunately, it’s not always possible to avoid an accident no matter how many preventive steps they take. You cannot control the other driver’s behavior or whether they have insurance to pay for potentially thousands of dollars worth of damage they could cause. How Many Florida Drivers Are Uninsured? Florida law mandates a minimal auto insurance standard, but Florida does not require drivers to have liability insurance. Even though Florida requires some coverage, Florida ranks number two in the nation for the highest portion of uninsured drivers, which is around 24%. “1 in 4 drivers on Florida roads do not have any car insurance.” With all of these factors out of the driver’s control, the best way to prepare for an accident is to protect yourself from the financial fallout that is likely to accompany an accident by purchasing uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage. This coverage can make all the difference between financial security and financial ruin after an accident.  Uninsured motorist (UM) and Underinsured Motorist (UIM) coverage function much like Bodily Injury Automobile Insurance coverage. UM coverage provides insurance coverage to the policyholder for damages caused by the negligence of a vehicle driver that does not have insurance. UIM coverage provides insurance coverage should the negligent driver’s insurance coverage be insufficient to pay for all of the harm they cause. You can use UM and UIM to pay for: Medical expenses, both present and future Lost wages Pain and suffering Future loss of earning potential Disability costs Different Categories of Uninsured Motorist Insurance Policies There is not just one type of uninsured motorist insurance coverage; there are multiple categories that each cover different damages. You can include different types of coverage for whatever kinds of damages you desire. It would be best if you looked over the details of each policy to determine which one is right for you. The following are two of the categories of UM/UIM insurance you…

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Florida Uninsured & Underinsured Motorist Lawyer

Florida Uninsured & Underinsured Motorist Lawyer Uninsured or Underinsured Motorist is usually referred to as “UM” coverage. It is one of the most important coverages you can buy, because it pays you for your injury if the person who is at fault doesn’t have any or enough liability coverage. It’s like buying liability insurance for everyone else on the street, in case they injure you or someone in your family under the same policy. With all of the people driving that have no liability coverage at all, a good UM policy can make all the difference. Contact our Florida uninsured & underinsured motorist lawyers for more information. We have offices in Orlando, Fort Myers, Tampa, Jacksonville, West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale & Miami. Why Should I Purchase Extra Coverage in Florida? Uninsured and underinsured drivers are a big problem in our state, partially due to very lenient regulations regarding liability insurance. The Florida Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) estimates that one in seven Florida drivers is uninsured. That means that millions of Florida drivers are uninsured. Millions more only have the bare minimum $10,000 of Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage and $10,000 in Property Damage Liability (PDL). PIP only applies to the driver that purchased the coverage, so even if the other party was negligent and caused the crash, that coverage will not apply to you. Additionally, PDL only applies only to property damage that the negligent party causes. If you were seriously hurt, it is likely that A) your car will be totalled and the $10,000 PDL will be maxed out and likely not even pay for a new vehicle, and B) the severe injuries will incur medical costs well into the five or six digits. The DMV may require drivers with poor driving records to also purchase Bodily Injury Liability (BIL) insurance coverage. BIL coverage can be as small as $10,000 per person and $30,000 per accident, meaning that it still may not come even close to covering your hospital bills, let alone your pain and suffering damages. Split Limit Uninsured Motorist Coverage Versus Combined Single Limit Uninsured Motorist Coverage There are two types of UM coverage: split limit and combined single limit. Most people end up with a split limit. A split limit policy will allot differing amounts if there is just one versus multiple people injured in the collision. A split policy would give $15,000 for a single injury or death and $30,000 for a collision in which multiple people were injured or killed, for example A combined single limit policy of the same maximum coverage would give $30,000, if needed, for a collision regardless of how many victims were in your vehicle. Uninsured Motorist Coverage Applies in a Wide Number of Circumstances Uninsured motorist coverage does not only apply to you, or to only you when you are in your vehicle. UM coverage can be used for family members whether they were in your vehicle for the collision or not (it covers family members, and you, if they or you were riding with someone else, or driving another person’s vehicle as well). Additionally, UM coverage applies to passengers of your vehicle. It covers hit and runs, phantom vehicle collisions, and when you or family members were hit as pedestrians or cyclists. UM coverage pays for lost wages, sickness, bodily injury, medical expenses, and diseases resulting from the motor vehicle collision, according to the Florida Bar. Contact an Experienced Florida Uninsured Motorist Lawyer Today for Help Purchasing UM Coverage Uninsured Motorist coverage is not as simple as standard liability coverage or health insurance. UM coverage can be complicated. If you need any help understanding your policy, give us a call. We highly recommend spending the time discussing your options and…

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How Much Insurance Should I Have: Uninsured Motorists

How Much Insurance Should I Have: Uninsured Motorists – Mickey Keenan, P.A.Florida is very lenient when it comes to regulations regarding liability insurance. With this leniency, uninsured and underinsured drivers have become a huge problem in Florida. The Florida DMV estimates that one in five drivers are uninsured (up from 1 in 7 just a few years ago), which means millions of drivers are on the road uninsured or with bare minimum insurance. Uninsured or Underinsured Motorist coverage (UM coverage), is one of the most important coverages you can have as part of your auto insurance policy in Florida. It is essentially a safeguard that pays for your injuries when the at-fault person does not have any or enough liability coverage. Sadly, without this key coverage it makes it harder for our car accident attorneys to make things right again for you should you be involved in a crash. This begs the question, how much UM insurance should you have? Auto Insurance in Florida Driving without auto insurance in Florida is against the law, but just because you purchase the minimum amount of required auto insurance doesn’t mean it is enough to cover you and your vehicle in an accident. In Florida, the bare minimum required insurance means having $10,000 of Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage and $10,000 in Property Damage Liability (PDL). It is important to understand that PIP coverage only applies to the driver that purchased the coverage, so even if you were not at fault, the at-fault driver’s insurance will not apply to you! Additionally, PDL only applies to property damage that the negligent party causes. Simply stated, with Florida being a “no-fault” state, your insurance will be used to cover any medical bills, damage expenses, loss of work expenses, etc.  Why Should I Purchase Extra Coverage in Florida? As just stated, if you are involved in an accident through no fault of your own, your own auto insurance coverage will be responsible for covering your damages. But why do you need to have more than the required bare minimum that Florida law requires for auto insurance coverage? UM coverage, or uninsured/underinsured coverage, does not just cover you, but it also applies to passengers and family members. It is also applicable in a hit and run accident, or if you (or family members) are hit as a pedestrian or cyclist. Your required $10,000 PIP and PDL coverage will most likely be maxed out if you are seriously hurt. UM coverage pays for medical expenses, bodily injury, lost wages, sickness, and more that are the results of a motor vehicle accident. Think about it this way, a new car will cost you more than $10,000 and severe medical bills/lost wages, etc., will cost you well into the five and six digits. Related > Want to save on auto insurance…Why you shouldn’t cut UM from your policy Picking Proper UM Coverage Now that you know the importance of having more than the bare minimum required insurance, how do you know how much coverage to have? We now know that UM coverage is an additional and supplemental insurance,…

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The 2022 Florida Statutes – Online Sunshine

Statutes & Constitution :View Statutes : Online Sunshine The 2022 Florida Statutes F.S. 627.727627.727 Motor vehicle insurance; uninsured and underinsured vehicle coverage; insolvent insurer protection.—(1) No motor vehicle liability insurance policy which provides bodily injury liability coverage shall be delivered or issued for delivery in this state with respect to any specifically insured or identified motor vehicle registered or principally garaged in this state unless uninsured motor vehicle coverage is provided therein or supplemental thereto for the protection of persons insured thereunder who are legally entitled to recover damages from owners or operators of uninsured motor vehicles because of bodily injury, sickness, or disease, including death, resulting therefrom. However, the coverage required under this section is not applicable when, or to the extent that, an insured named in the policy makes a written rejection of the coverage on behalf of all insureds under the policy. When a motor vehicle is leased for a period of 1 year or longer and the lessor of such vehicle, by the terms of the lease contract, provides liability coverage on the leased vehicle, the lessee of such vehicle shall have the sole privilege to reject uninsured motorist coverage or to select lower limits than the bodily injury liability limits, regardless of whether the lessor is qualified as a self-insurer pursuant to s. 324.171. Unless an insured, or lessee having the privilege of rejecting uninsured motorist coverage, requests such coverage or requests higher uninsured motorist limits in writing, the coverage or such higher uninsured motorist limits need not be provided in or supplemental to any other policy which renews, extends, changes, supersedes, or replaces an existing policy with the same bodily injury liability limits when an insured or lessee had rejected the coverage. When an insured or lessee has initially selected limits of uninsured motorist coverage lower than her or his bodily injury liability limits, higher limits of uninsured motorist coverage need not be provided in or supplemental to any other policy which renews, extends, changes, supersedes, or replaces an existing policy with the same bodily injury liability limits unless an insured requests higher uninsured motorist coverage in writing. The rejection or selection of lower limits shall be made on a form approved by the office. The form shall fully advise the applicant of the nature of the coverage and shall state that the coverage is equal to bodily injury liability limits unless lower limits are requested or the coverage is rejected. The heading of the form shall be in 12-point bold type and shall state: “You are electing not to purchase certain valuable coverage which protects you and your family or you are purchasing uninsured motorist limits less than your bodily injury liability limits when you sign this form. Please read carefully.” If this form is signed by a named insured, it will be conclusively presumed that there was an informed, knowing rejection of coverage or election of lower limits on behalf of all insureds. The insurer shall notify the named insured at least annually of her or his options as to the coverage required by this section. Such notice shall be part of, and attached to, the notice of premium, shall provide for a means to allow the insured to request such coverage, and shall be given in a manner approved by the office. Receipt of this notice does not constitute an affirmative waiver of the insured’s right to uninsured motorist coverage where the insured has not signed a selection or rejection form. The coverage described under this section shall be over and above, but shall not duplicate, the benefits available to an insured under any workers’ compensation law, personal injury protection benefits, disability benefits law, or similar law; under any automobile medical expense coverage; under any motor…

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What is Uninsured Motorist (UM) Coverage in Florida?

What is Uninsured Motorist (UM) Coverage in Florida?In Florida, you are not required to purchase Uninsured Motorist Insurance coverage. However, we think this is an extremely important coverage to have in Florida. Each state has different insurance laws. This information applies to Florida policies only. Florida Uninsured Motorist Insurance Coverage ExplainedThis article covers 7 Frequently asked questions. Read below to learn:What is Uninsured Motorist Coverage?Why is UM coverage important in Florida?I have medical insurance. Why should I buy UM on my car insurance policy?What UM coverage limits are available?What’s the difference between stacked and non-stacked uninsured motorist (UM) coverage?I have an old car. I don’t think I need high insurance limits, right?How much auto insurance coverage do I need? What is uninsured motorist (UM) coverage in Florida?In Florida, Uninsured Motorist Coverage is an optional coverage you can purchase on your own auto insurance policy. Uninsured Motorist coverage is for you and your relatives who live with you, and people who occupy your car. UM pays you for injuries caused by an auto accident where the at-fault driver is uninsured (has no insurance) or under-insured driver (not enough insurance). UM coverage can be used where you or your family members or driver of your car did not cause the auto accident.One thing to know, UM does not pay for your car.   We recommend purchasing collision coverage on your car to cover damages to your car caused by an uninsured motorist.UM coverage pays for things like:medical billsloss of the future enjoyment of lifelost wages and disabilitylong term nursing carewheelchairs and medical devicespain & sufferingdeathreplacement services for things you are no longer able to do: yard service, cleaning, etc.· cost to retro-fit your house to accommodate disabilities caused by the auto accident Why is uninsured motorist important in Florida?· In 2012, 23.8% of Florida drivers had no auto insurance. Florida ranks #5 in the USA for the number of uninsured drivers on the road· In Florida, drivers are considered “insured” with limits as low as $10,000 per person/$20,000 per accident for bodily injury. That doesn’t even pay for a trip to the Emergency Room these days.· 49% of Florida auto insurance policies have limits of $25,000 per person or lower.If you are hurt or injured in a car accident by one of these uninsured (no insurance) or under-insured drivers (not enough insurance), you may have to pay for your own injuries out of pocket. This is why we recommend you buy uninsured motorist coverage. I have medical insurance. Why should I buy uninsured motorist coverage?Medical bills are only a portion of what you can claim on uninsured motorist coverage. UM also pays for things like….· loss of the future enjoyment of life· lost wages and disability· Long term nursing care· wheelchairs and medical devices· Pain & suffering· Death· replacement services for things you are no longer able to do: yard service, cleaning, etc.· retro-fit your house to accommodate disabilities caused by the auto accidentMost of the list above is not covered or are limited by medical insurance. What Uninsured Motorist coverage limits are available?In Florida, you can reject UM coverage, or chose a limit of insurance. You cannot chose an uninsured motorist limit higher than the bodily injury liability limit you selected. Typical uninsured motorist limits available on auto insurance policies are:Non-Stacked UM Limits AvailableStacked UM Limits Available$10,000 / $20,000$10,000 / $20,000$25,000/ $50,000$25,000/ $50,000$50,000/ $100,000$50,000/ $100,000$100,000/ $300,000$100,000/ $300,000$250,000/ $500,000$250,000/ $500,000$500,000/ $500,000$500,000/ $500,000* Higher limits available…

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Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida & Why It's Important

Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida & Why It’s Important – Emmanuel Sheppard & CondonAccording to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, in 2019 Florida ranked well above the national average in terms of both deaths from motor vehicle crashes per capita and deaths per vehicle mile traveled. The state suffered over 3,000 traffic fatalities that year.Many survivors face financial troubles caused by medical bills and lost earning capacity when they discover that even with a solid personal injury case, the defendant (that is, the at-fault party in the accident) lacks the insurance resources to pay their claim.Many of these financial hardships can be avoided if the injured driver purchases adequate uninsured motorist coverage.Our experienced Pensacola, Florida auto accident lawyers will explain what you should know. For a free consultation, please call (850) 444-4878 or send us an online message today.Florida’s “No-Fault” Auto Insurance SystemFlorida administers a “no-fault” auto insurance system. Florida requires its drivers to carry $10,000 in PIP insurance for their injuries and injuries to their households, children, and passengers.According to the Insurance Information Institute, in 2019 Florida had one of the highest rates of uninsured drivers in the United States, with just over 20% of drivers uninsured.This figure doesn’t even take into account the fact that any Florida driver who carries only the legal minimum insurance coverage is tremendously underinsured for anything even approaching a serious injury.What is Uninsured Motorist Coverage in Florida?Uninsured motorist coverage in Florida covers you if you suffer damages inflicted by a driver who was driving without insurance or who had too little insurance.Generally, the same insurance policies also protect you if the responsible motorist was underinsured rather than completely uninsured. Uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance in Florida protects you from the consequences of the irresponsibility of other motorists.Does Florida Require Uninsured Motorist Coverage?In Florida, uninsured motorist coverage is optional. We believe it to be a practical necessity, however, and many options are available.Alternative DefendantsImagine that you find yourself facing a serious personal injury, a deadbeat defendant with no economic resources, and no Florida uninsured motorist coverage.Another option, if it is possible, might be to find an alternative defendant—someone who is at least partially responsible for the accident—with better insurance coverage or the resources to pay your claim.Such defendants might include:A commercial trucker;An on-duty Uber or Lyft driver;An on-duty employee whose employer possesses significant financial resources;The manufacturer of a defective product that contributed to the accident;A state or local government that failed to properly maintain roads, traffic lights, etc.; orA bar or nightclub that served alcohol to the defendant before the accident (under Florida’s dram shop law).The suitability of any of these defendants depends on the presence or absence of certain circumstances surrounding your case. A good lawyer will know how to locate alternative defendants and hold them liable.We’re Ready For ActionFailure to maintain uninsured motorist coverage in Florida might save you money in the short run, but it could devastate your finances in the event of a serious accident.But we can help you explore your options if you find yourself facing a situation…

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Should You Have Uninsured Motorist Coverage If You Live In …

Should You Have Uninsured Motorist Coverage If You Live In Florida? A look at the basics, pros, and cons of having uninsured motorist coverage in the Sunshine State from the perspective of a personal injury law firm Buying or updating your car insurance policy can be confusing. There are a lot of random numbers and terms you’ll encounter, and you may have no idea what they mean (250/500/250? PIP? UIM?). You have a ton of different companies to choose from, and they’re all offering deals that seem to be great on the surface – they’re all promising to be the best and promoting different angles. What’s more, many times you’ll see a great deal based on some initial information that you provide, but then when you go all the way through the process of getting a quote and come to the point of actually purchasing a policy, the price will have jumped up dramatically; much to your frustration, you may not even know why. While explaining all of the nuances of buying car insurance would take more than just a single blog post, we wanted to dedicate this one to talking about uninsured motorist coverage and answering some of the most common questions that Florida drivers have. What is it? Is it included in comprehensive coverage? Should you have uninsured motorist coverage if you live in Florida? Is it really necessary to have this type of coverage, or are you okay with just regular coverage? How expensive is uninsured motorist coverage? How much should you have if you get it? Let’s dive in. *Note: this is not a comprehensive guide to uninsured motorist coverage. We’re not insurance professionals, but in another sense, we are a kind of insurance expert; as Florida personal injury trial lawyers, we’ve spent over 37 years helping injured accident victims fight for fair compensation from insurance companies, including for accidents caused by an uninsured motorist, and we have recovered over $1 billion dollars for our clients. We get how insurance companies work and what kinds of coverage Florida residents should have in order to have the best chance at making a successful claim! What is uninsured motorist coverage, and why do Florida personal injury lawyers recommend having it? Uninsured motorist coverage (UM) and underinsured motorist coverage (UIM) are available as one type of coverage in the state of Florida (UM/UIM). This is insurance that pays for the costs of an accident when it was caused by a driver who either didn’t have insurance at all or didn’t have the minimum amount of insurance required by the state. UM/UIM coverage can cover injury expenses and lost wages. You can buy coverage as a limit per person and a limit per accident. For example, a $100,000/$300,000 policy would mean that you have $100,000 worth of coverage per person or $300,000 worth of coverage per accident for all parties involved. It’s important to note that uninsured motorist coverage is NOT the same thing as personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, which in Florida covers medical costs of an accident (and lost wages) no matter which driver is at fault. All drivers in Florida are required by law to carry PIP coverage, but UM/UIM coverage is optional. Just because accident insurance is mandatory under law does not mean that everyone will have it, though, and unfortunately, Florida has one of the highest rates of uninsured drivers in the nation. In 2019, one study had our state ranking 6th for percentage of uninsured drivers (20.4%). Another report released…

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Uninsured Motorist Coverage Florida | Rosen & Ohr Law

Uninsured Motorist Coverage Florida | Rosen & Ohr LawUninsured/Underinsured Motorist (UM) CoverageUninsured/Underinsured Motorist (UM) coverage is designed to protect you if you are involved in a car accident with another driver who lacks adequate insurance to pay for your injuries. If you are injured in a car accident caused by a driver who has only the state-required insurance coverage, minimal extra coverage, or no insurance coverage at all, UM coverage may be the only way for you to recover any financial compensation.Since 1965, our personal injury firm has represented clients who have sustained serious injuries from all types of causes, including car accidents. Our philosophy is to focus first on serving our clients and allow everything else to follow from there.You are welcome to read more below about UM motorist coverage, however, if you or a loved one has suffered a serious injury as the result of a car accident, contact our personal injury lawyers today for a FREE CONSULTATION by calling (954) 981-1852 or using our online form. We are passionate and deeply committed to seeing justice served for all our clients. During our consultation, we will gladly discuss how we can help protect your rights and fight for all the compensation you deserve! Let Rosen & Ohr, P.A. serve you!What Does Uninsured Motorist Cover?The State of Florida mandates that motorists must carry only a minimum amount of auto insurance coverage; Personal Injury Protection (PIP) insurance in the amount of $10,000 and property damage liability in the amount of $10,000.Florida UM Insurance LawIf you purchase elective UM insurance coverage protection, you’ll have an additional source of insurance that will take effect when your own PIP coverage and the coverage of a negligent driver, if they even have any, falls short.UM CoverageUM coverage protects you, your spouse, and your relatives that reside in the same household as you, with some exceptions regarding the “residential requirement.”Also, unless your insurance company specifically tells you otherwise, this type of coverage applies regardless of the vehicle you may be in or driving at the time of a collision, as long as you had permission from the owner to drive or be in that vehicle.UM BenefitsIn order to recover UM benefits, you must prove that another driver was at fault and that the injuries sustained are of a serious or “permanent” nature. As an injured driver, you must first exhaust your PIP and the at-fault driver’s insurance limits before recovering from your own UM policy.In some cases, if your UM insurance company fails to honor your claim, you may also be able to recover in excess of your UM policy’s limits by pursuing what is called a “bad faith” cause of action. In addition to receiving more than your policy limits, a successful bad faith case may provide you with interest on unpaid benefits, reasonable attorney’s fees and costs, and any damages caused by a violation of the Florida “bad faith” law.Uninsured and underinsured motorist insurance can pay for your medical bills, damages, and losses when all other methods of compensation are inadequate or unavailable. However, the laws are complicated and the amount of compensation you receive for your injuries can vary greatly, depending upon the success of your claim. Working with an experienced Florida UM law firm can help to hold the insurance company accountable and prevent them from denying your claim.Contact Our Florida UM Attorneys TodayIf you or a loved one has suffered a serious injury as the result of a car accident, you have the right to seek compensation. You deserve experienced help to deal with your medical bills and the insurance companies. Don’t delay. Contact our skilled and experienced Florida accident law firm today.With over 45 years of service in South Florida, we have successfully represented car accident victims in all areas of South Florida, including Hollywood, Pembroke Pines, Aventura, Hallandale, Ft. Lauderdale, North Miami Beach, Miami, Sunny Isles, Cooper City, Dania Beach, Broward County, Dade County, and Palm Beach County.Call us at (954) 981-1852 or use our online form for…

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