How to Check if You Have a Bench Warrant in Florida – TicketFit

ContentsWhat is a Warrant in Florida?How to Find Out if You Have a Warrant in Florida?How Long Does a Warrant Stay Active in Florida?What is a Florida Search Warrant?What Can Make a Florida Search Warrant Invalid?What is an Arrest Warrant in Florida?What is a Child Support Arrest Warrant in Florida?What is a Florida Bench Warrant?In…



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What is a Warrant in Florida?

A warrant authorizes law enforcement agents to arrest, search, detain, or carry out any other action that would otherwise be an infringement of a person’s rights. In Florida, judges typically issue warrants for different reasons relating to law enforcement for justice administration.

Florida courts issue different types of warrants, depending on each case’s requirement. Common types of warrants are arrest, search, bench, and violation of probation warrants. Other types of warrants are complaint warrants, failure to appear warrants, child support arrest warrants, failure to pay warrants, execution warrants, and tax warrants. These warrants may authorize law enforcement agents to arrest and detain persons or seize such persons’ property.

As provided by Florida Statutes, a judge may issue a warrant after examining available complaints and proofs and determining that there is probable cause to issue a warrant. This means that a judge must determine that there are valid reasons to issue the warrant. Any law enforcement officer who requests or requires a warrant must show probable cause to the judge.

How to Find Out if You Have a Warrant in Florida?

Florida courts and law enforcement agents do not typically issue notices for warrants. Therefore, anyone who has reasons to believe they have a warrant in Florida may conduct a Florida Warrant Search. Interested parties may conduct Florida warrant searches in the following ways:

  • Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) Warrant Search
  • Clerk of Court or county website search
  • Contact the Clerk of Court
  • Sheriff’s Office website search
  • Through a bail bondsman or an experienced criminal attorney

Conducting an FDLE warrant search is easy and free. Requesting parties must visit the FDLE website and use the Florida Crime Information Center’s Wanted Persons search tool. Requesting parties may conduct the search using the subject’s first and last names, gender, race, or birth date. FDLE updates the information on the FCIC database every day.

Interested persons may also visit specific Clerks of Court, county websites, or Sheriff’s Office websites to find warrants. Some of these websites offer search portals where requesting parties may search for warrants using case numbers, names, gender, race, gender, and date of birth. An example of these websites is the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office website, which has a warrant inquiry tool. For the contact details and thus website of other Sheriff Departments in the state, use the FDLE Sheriff’s Office Directory.

Alternatively, interested persons may find existing warrants by contacting the Clerk of Court in the county where such persons live. Going through a bail bondsmen or experienced criminal attorney is quite helpful as they know how best to handle warrants if any exist.

Records of warrants issued or executed in various jurisdictions are also maintained and by third-party websites. While third-party sites make accessing these records substantially easier, the information available on the sites may vary since they are not government run sources. To obtain warrant records from a third-party site, the requesting party may be required to provide:

  • The personal information of the alleged suspect
  • Information regarding the issuing officer
  • The location where the warrant was issued.

How Long Does a Warrant Stay Active in Florida?

There are no statutes of limitations for most Florida warrants. Some warrants are active even after the statutes of limitations for the violation or crime for which the court issues the warrant. This means, for example, that law enforcement agents can arrest a person for a felony offense even after the statutes of limitation for the crime have passed. Florida warrants only become inactive if a judge calls off the warrant or if the warrant’s subject resolves it in court. Waiting out a warrant or moving out of state will not make the warrant expire.

To avoid unexpected arrests, delays, or other complications, it is best for persons who have outstanding warrants to answer or resolve the warrants as soon as possible. Depending on the type of warrant and the case involved, an attorney may be able to petition the court to dismiss a warrant successfully. Persons interested in finding out whether they have Florida arrest warrants may conduct quick and free searches on the FDLE website or Court Clerk websites.

What is a Florida Search Warrant?

A Florida search warrant is a legal document that authorizes law enforcement agents and process executors such as sheriffs, sheriff’s deputies, and police officers to search a person or property. The search warrant also allows law enforcement agents to bring the property or persons named in the warrant before the judge that signed the warrant or a court that has jurisdiction to hear the case. As with other types of warrants, the requesting officer must show reasonable cause for the judge to issue a search warrant.

The requesting officer must swear an affidavit before the judge in order to ensure the protection of the subject’s Fourth Amendment rights. This law protects people against unreasonable seizures and searches, protecting the rights of people to be safe in their homes and person. The affidavit must contain reasonable grounds or probable cause for the issuance of a search warrant. Under Chapter 933 of the Florida Statutes, any judge in Florida can issue a Florida search warrant on if:

  • The property contains evidence of a felony crime.
  • Florida’s animal cruelty laws were violated in the property
  • The property is embezzled or stolen
  • The property contains evidence of or is used to commit sexual cyber harassment
  • The property was used to commit any crime, including child abuse offenses
  • The property was used in connection with gambling appliances or gambling
  • The private residence was used for commercial purposes
  • The property held or owned is in violation of
    • Intoxicating liquor manufacture, sale, possession, and transportation laws.
    • Fish and game laws
    • Citrus disease laws
    • Food and drug laws
    • Obscene print and literature laws

What Can Make a Florida Search Warrant Invalid?

In the issuance of a Florida search warrant, all involved parties must follow the prescribed state rules. Otherwise, the search warrant may be invalid, or the defendant may petition the court to dismiss the warrant. A judge is the only person that Florida state laws authorize to issue search warrants; therefore, search warrants must have a judge’s signature, name, and office. Additionally, requesting officers must accompany requests for search warrants with affidavits. Florida laws prohibit blank search warrants, requesting officers must name and describe the person or property to be searched on the warrant. Only officers named on a warrant can execute the warrant. The named officers can execute the warrant at any time of day or night.

What is an Arrest Warrant in Florida?

Arrest warrants authorize the bearer, typically a sheriff, to arrest and detain the person named on the warrant at any time on any day. Courts issue arrest warrants in connection to crimes. According to Chapter 901 of the Florida State statutes, a judge must first examine the available complaints and proofs to determine whether there is probable cause to issue the arrest warrant. A judge may issue an arrest warrant after a jury indicts the subject or after a requesting officer demonstrates probable cause. The grounds on which a judge may issue a Florida arrest warrant are:

  • An officer files a complaint about a misdemeanor charge
  • The summons issued to the defendant is returned to the court without service

The requesting officer must sign an affidavit to support the warrant. The arrest warrant must also bear the judge’s signature and office. It is important to note that Florida laws permit law enforcement agents to arrest suspects without a warrant under certain circumstances, such as:

  • When the suspect commits an offense in the arresting officer’s presence
  • If the officer has reason to believe the suspect committed a felony
  • When the court has issued a warrant for the suspect’s arrest to another officer
  • When the suspect has violated the state Motor Vehicle Code
  • When the arresting officer has probable cause to believe that the suspect has committed an act of domestic violence or child abuse

What is a Child Support Arrest Warrant in Florida?

Courts issue child support arrest warrants against parents who refuse or fail to make child support payments. When the court orders or approves child support payments, non-compliant payments may be found in contempt of court, as such parents violate a court order. The Florida Child Support Program or a custodial parent may file legal action against the non-compliant parent to enforce the child support order.

When there is legal action against a non-compliant parent, the court sets a hearing date where all case parties must be present. If the non-compliant parent fails to appear in court at the scheduled hearing, the court may issue a warrant for the parent’s arrest. Law enforcement agents can execute child support arrest warrants at any time and anywhere. Non-compliant parents may face fines and jail time or other consequences such as wage garnishment and driver’s license suspension.

What is a Florida Bench Warrant?

A Florida bench warrant is a type of arrest warrant which judges issue for the arrest of persons who fail to appear in court or who miss court hearings without notice. Florida courts issue two types of bench warrants, depending on the type of offense involved in the failure to appear. If the offense involved is a misdemeanor, the court issues a bench warrant. If the failure to appear involves a felony, the court issues an alias capias. Persons arrested on alias capias warrants may not be able to post bail. Bench warrants authorize law enforcement officers to arrest the person named on the warrant as soon as the person is identified. Persons with bench warrants may contact lawyers for advice on how best to resolve the warrant.

In Florida, What is Failure to Appear?

Failing to appear in court is a serious offense in Florida. The court penalizes persons who miss scheduled court hearings without prior notice to the court and without sufficient reason. The circumstances where a person may be guilty of Failure to Appear are as follows:

  • Failure to appear for a trial: this occurs when a defendant misses a trial. The court may continue the trial without the party – that is, a trial in absentia. The court may also deliver a conviction without the missing party’s defense.
  • Failure to appear in a civil court hearing: failure to appear in civil hearings, such as small claims suits, divorce, and other civil cases, may result in a default judgment against the defendant in favor of the plaintiff. If the plaintiff fails to appear, the court may dismiss the case.
  • Failure to appear in a criminal court: it means missing pre-trial hearings is a criminal offense in Florida. The court may issue an arrest warrant for persons who fail to appear in criminal courts. Additionally, such a person may not be eligible to post bail after arrest. This means that the party will be detained until the resolution or conclusion of the case.
  • Failure to appear after summons: the court summons people to appear as witnesses in civil or criminal cases. If such parties refuse to obey the court’s subpoena, the court may issue a warrant for the parties’ arrest.
  • Failure to appear after bond: persons who fail to appear in court after being released on bail in relation to a misdemeanor or felony offenses may be charged to court for failing to appear. Failing to appear after posting bail for a misdemeanor offense is a first-degree misdemeanor in Florida. If the offense under trial is a felony, then failing to appear after posting bail is a third-degree felony in Florida.

How Long Do You Have to Stay in Jail for a Warrant for Missing Court in Florida?

The jail sentence for missing court or failure to appear depends on the type of case the person is a party to. The court issues bench warrants for the arrest of persons who fail to appear in court after posting bail. According to Chapter 843.15 of the Florida State Statutes, such a person may forfeit bail and remain in detention until the end of the case. Additionally, the person will be guilty of a criminal offense in Florida. If the person was released on bail in connection to a misdemeanor, the person is guilty of a first-degree misdemeanor. The penalty for first-degree misdemeanors in Florida is a fine of up to $1,000 and a jail term of up to 12 months. Failure to appear is a third-degree felony in Florida if:

  • The person was arrested and released on bail in connection to a felony offense.
  • The person missed court or failed to appear while awaiting a sentence
  • The person failed to appear after a conviction while the sentence was under review by certiorari

Florida penalizes third-degree felony offenses with fines of up to $5,000 and jail terms of up to five (5) years.

In Florida, What is Failure to Pay?

Failure to make court-ordered payments in Florida, such as child support, fines, or civil penalties, can result in serious consequences. The court may enforce payment through different means. It is also important to note that willful refusal to pay court-ordered fees is contempt of court, which can result in jail terms, fines, and suspension of the offender’s driver’s license. Other consequences include:

  • Suspension of professional licenses
  • Property lien
  • Bank account seizure
  • Paycheck and compensation withholding

What is a No-Knock Warrant in Florida?

A no-knock warrant authorizes the bearer to enter a property without ringing the doorbell, knocking, or otherwise notifying the occupants of the property. Following the Supreme Court’s decision in the State vs. Bamber case of 1994, Florida does not issue no-knock warrants. However, Florida police may execute no-knock warrants if:

  • The occupants of the property are aware of the police presence with a search warrant.
  • The arresting officers have reason to believe that the occupants of the property are in imminent danger.
  • The arresting officers have reason to believe that the occupants of the building are destroying evidence or attempting to escape.
  • Knocking may increase the possibility of danger to the arresting officer.

FAQs

How do you search if I have a warrant in Florida?

How to Find Out if You Have a Warrant in Florida?

  1. Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) Warrant Search.
  2. Clerk of Court or county website search.
  3. Contact the Clerk of Court.
  4. Sheriff’s Office website search.
  5. Through a bail bondsman or an experienced criminal attorney.

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How long does a warrant stay active in Florida?

Even if you are not aware of the warrant and are no longer in the state, outstanding warrants never expire.

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How long does it take for a warrant to process in Florida?

You just show up and surrender and then the clerk of court will be notified and they will set a court date. That can take 2 days to 3 weeks.

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Do warrants show up on background checks in Florida?

Warrants on Your Background Check Unless this information is expunged from your record, meaning it’s removed, that person can see anything on your record. That may include active warrants for your arrest in Tampa or beyond.

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What is Florida extradition limit?

The Uniform Criminal Extradition Act imposes a 30 day time limit on the State of Florida to physically extradite you. However, this time limit can be extended by a period of up to an additional 60 days, at the discretion of the court where yo are currently being held.

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What does FDLE stand for?

As a result of Florida governmental restructuring in July 1969, the Bureau became the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, or FDLE, the name the agency bears to this day.

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How do I clear a warrant in Florida?

As a general rule, getting a warrant rescinded requires an appearance in front of a judge. Sometimes, your attorney can file a motion with the court asking the court to withdraw the warrant; however, in most cases, the judge requires the defendant to appear in person.

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What happens after a warrant is issued?

In the event the Warrant has to be executed outside the local jurisdiction of the Court from which the Warrant has been issued, The Court issuing the Warrant shall forward the Warrant to the Court, Executive Magistrate and/or Commissioner of Police within local limits of whose jurisdiction it is to be executed and then …

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Can you do a background check on yourself?

Yes. Better Future by Checkr gives candidates the opportunity to request a background check on themselves for free. We believe that everyone has a right to know what information of theirs could come up during the employment process.

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Do arrests show up on a background check or just convictions?

Unfortunately, all arrests appear on search results when doing a background check, irrespective of how the case ended. This includes not only charges that result in convictions or plea bargains, but also those that were dropped or dismissed, as well as acquittals. An arrest will show up even if you were not charged.

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What shows up on a background check?

Nearly all background checks include a criminal-history check, based on information supplied by the candidate, including their Social Security number. Criminal background checks will reveal felony and misdemeanor criminal convictions, any pending criminal cases, and any history of incarceration as an adult.

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How far back does a background check go?

4 answers. 5 years. However this might changed based on the role you are applying for.

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How long does a misdemeanor stay on your record in Florida?

If you have been convicted of a misdemeanor in the State of Florida, it is going to stay on your record forever unless you are able to have the conviction overturned.

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Can you get a job with criminal record?

Yes, you can. However, it’s very possible that after finding out about your criminal record and reviewing your disclosure, an employer will decide to hire you. ?No matter what has happened in your past, that should not dictate your future.

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Does Florida follow the 7 year rule?

Florida has no laws that limit how far back an employer can look into a candidate’s past regarding criminal convictions. However, the state does abide by national laws, including the FCRA. The FCRA’s ?seven-year rule? mandates that arrests not be reported for more than seven years on any background check.

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How much does it cost to get your record expunged in Florida?

1) $75 fee to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). This is the state agency that approves your expungement or sealing application. 2) $42.00 to the Clerk of Courts.

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Does criminal record expire?

As mentioned earlier, not all convictions are cleared from an individual’s record and some remain forever. This means that certain crimes will always show up on a DBS check, regardless of the level of check. Serious crimes of a violent or sexual nature will always remain on a person’s criminal record.

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Can you join the police with a criminal record?

Criminal convictions and cautions

All convictions, cautions (including any received as a juvenile), involvement in any criminal investigation and bind-overs imposed by a court must be declared. They don’t automatically mean you’ll be rejected from joining the police service.

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Can I work in a bank with a criminal record?

However recruitment for finance sector jobs typically excludes people with criminal records, regardless of their talent or the relevance of their convictions. Often positions are excluded from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and recruiters are also barring people with very old, spent convictions.

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Wanted Persons – The FCIC

Wanted PersonsSearch Wanted PersonsThis page is used to search for a wanted person as entered by a law enforcement agency within the State of Florida. The criteria that can be used to search for a wanted person are as follows: Last Name First Name Middle Name or Initial Nickname Race Sex Date of Birth Age At a minimum, the last 2 characters of the person’s last name or the exact nickname is required for a wanted person search. The last name may contain a hyphen or alphabetical characters. The First Name, Middle Name, and Nickname must be alphabetical characters only. If a Nickname is specified, it must be the exact nickname. Only 1 of Date of Birth or Age can be specified for a wanted person search. The date of birth must be in one of the two formats, MM/DD/YYYY or MM-DD-YYYY. Example: 01/15/1971, 11-03-1961 View Wanted Person Search ResultsWhen performing a wanted person search, the system will display the results of the search in a table that includes has following column headers. Name Date of Birth Race Sex Reporting Agency If an image exists in the system for a wanted person, a camera icon will be displayed next the Name information. A blank field indicates that is no data available for it. To view a person that has been reported wanted, please click the person’s name link. Clicking on the column header will sort the search result data. Please note that there is a maximum of 500 results returned for any search for the Public Access System. View Wanted PersonThe View Wanted Person page will display all information entered for the wanted person by the reporting agency that will include the following information: Name Nicknames Aliases Offense Reporting Agency Agency Case # Date of Warrant Warrant # Date of Birth Race Sex Height Weight Hair Color Eye Color Scars, Marks, Tattoos Occupation Last Known Address, City and State A blank field indicates that there was no data entered for it. If an image exists in the system for a stolen vehicle, it will be displayed. The View Wanted Person page will have a “Send A Tip” button that will allow for an e-mail to be sent to the reporting agency if you have information regarding the wanted person. The View Wanted Person page will also display, if available, the phone number of the reporting law enforcement agency. If you wish to report a tip without disclosing your name, you may do so.

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Florida Warrant Search | StateRecords.org

Florida Warrant Search | StateRecords.orgWhat is a Warrant in Florida?A warrant authorizes law enforcement agents to arrest, search, detain, or carry out any other action that would otherwise be an infringement of a person’s rights. In Florida, judges typically issue warrants for different reasons relating to law enforcement for justice administration.Florida courts issue different types of warrants, depending on each case’s requirement. Common types of warrants are arrest, search, bench, and violation of probation warrants. Other types of warrants are complaint warrants, failure to appear warrants, child support arrest warrants, failure to pay warrants, execution warrants, and tax warrants. These warrants may authorize law enforcement agents to arrest and detain persons or seize such persons’ property.As provided by Florida Statutes, a judge may issue a warrant after examining available complaints and proofs and determining that there is probable cause to issue a warrant. This means that a judge must determine that there are valid reasons to issue the warrant. Any law enforcement officer who requests or requires a warrant must show probable cause to the judge.How to Find Out if You Have a Warrant in Florida?Florida courts and law enforcement agents do not typically issue notices for warrants. Therefore, anyone who has reasons to believe they have a warrant in Florida may conduct a Florida Warrant Search. Interested parties may conduct Florida warrant searches in the following ways:Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) Warrant SearchClerk of Court or county website searchContact the Clerk of CourtSheriff’s Office website searchThrough a bail bondsman or an experienced criminal attorneyConducting an FDLE warrant search is easy and free. Requesting parties must visit the FDLE website and use the Florida Crime Information Center’s Wanted Persons search tool. Requesting parties may conduct the search using the subject’s first and last names, gender, race, or birth date. FDLE updates the information on the FCIC database every day.Interested persons may also visit specific Clerks of Court, county websites, or Sheriff’s Office websites to find warrants. Some of these websites offer search portals where requesting parties may search for warrants using case numbers, names, gender, race, gender, and date of birth. An example of these websites is the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office website, which has a warrant inquiry tool. For the contact details and thus website of other Sheriff Departments in the state, use the FDLE Sheriff’s Office Directory.Alternatively, interested persons may find existing warrants by contacting the Clerk of Court in the county where such persons live. Going through a bail bondsmen or experienced criminal attorney is quite helpful as they know how best to handle warrants if any exist.Records of warrants issued or executed in various jurisdictions are also maintained and by third-party websites. While third-party sites make accessing these records substantially easier, the information available on the sites may vary since they are not government run sources. To obtain warrant records from a third-party site, the requesting party may be required to provide:The personal information of the alleged suspectInformation regarding the issuing officerThe location where the warrant was issued.How Long Does a Warrant Stay Active in Florida?There are no statutes of limitations for most Florida warrants. Some warrants are active even after the statutes of limitations for the violation or crime for which the court issues the warrant. This means, for example, that law enforcement agents can arrest a person for a felony offense even after the statutes of limitation for the crime have passed. Florida…

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How to Clear a Bench Warrant in Florida

Free FDLE Warrant Search – Sammis Law Firm

Attorneys Help with FDLE Warrant Search for “Wanted Persons” in Florida You can search for an outstanding arrest warrant for free on the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) website by using the Florida Criminal Information Center (FCIC) Public Records Search Page. Searching for the FDLE website for an arrest warrant is always free, although not all outstanding warrants are immediately listed there. The information on “wanted persons” is reported to FDLE by law enforcement agencies throughout the state. To conduct the search inquiry, use the subject’s first name, last name, nickname, race, sex, and/or date of birth. The FDLE’s free searchable database contains information on warrants that remain active throughout the State of Florida. The information on the FCIC Public Records Search Page is updated every 24 hours. Click here for the FDLE Warrant Search If the warrant is not listed on the FDLE site, then go to the sheriff’s office website in the county where the crime allegedly occurred. The sheriff’s office in each county usually maintains an online database with search features. So if you know the county in which the warrant originated, search the sheriff’s office website to find the warrant there. Finally, you might find information about a warrant on the clerk of court’s website, especially for a violation of probation case, or a capias after a failure to appear in court. Even if the warrant is NOT listed on the FDLE website or these other sites, it might still exist. The law enforcement officer might be holding the warrant (sometimes called the “pocket warrant”) before entering it into the system. A criminal defense attorney can contact the investigating officer on your behalf to present your side of the story and request that the warrant is not entered into the system pending further investigation. In some cases, the prosecutor with the state attorney’s office might assist in helping to get the warrant withdrawn, especially in a case of mistaken identity or when false accusations were made. We can help you determine if you have an outstanding warrant in Florida for free. If we find the warrant during the initial consultation, our criminal defense attorneys can help you figure out the best way to resolve the warrant and the underlying charge. Attorneys Help Resolve Warrants in the FDLE Database If you have an outstanding warrant for your arrest in Florida, then contact an experienced criminal defense attorney at Sammis Law Firm in Tampa, FL, for help. We can help you verify that the arrest or bench warrant information is accurate by contacting the local law enforcement agency or the reporting agency. After we confirm the existence of the warrant, we can help you develop the best plan of action to resolve the warrant on the best possible terms. We also represent clients facing extradition to or from Florida on a felony warrant. In some cases, it might be possible to avoid the long and expensive extradition process, especially if the warrant is particularly old or relates to a violation of probation case. If you avoid a conviction on the underlying charges, then you might become eligible to seal or expunge the criminal history record after the warrant is resolved. Our main office is located in downtown Tampa, FL, in Hillsborough County. We have additional offices conveniently located in New Port Richey in Pasco County, and Clearwater in Pinellas County, FL. Our attorneys fight cases throughout the greater Tampa Bay area. Call 813-250-0500 to discuss your case. Types of Warrants on FDLE’s Search Feature The FDLE searchable database shows information about different types of warrants for “wanted persons” including: an outstanding criminal arrest warrant; failure to appear (FTA) capias; bench warrant; direct capias in the form of a writ prepared by the Clerk of Circuit Court; direct file arrest warrant issued by the State Attorney’s Office with a finding of probable cause; fugitive or extradition warrant; or violation of probation warrant. A bench warrant can…

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How to Check if You Have a Bench Warrant in Florida – TicketFit

How to Check if You Have a Bench Warrant in Florida – TicketFit If you missed a court date in Florida, you may have a bench warrant out for your arrest. And while you can contact our criminal defense attorney at (305) 775-3720 for a free warrant check, here are a few steps you can take to check. How to Check If You Have a Bench Warrant in Florida Fortunately, there are a few ways you can find out if you have a warrant out for your arrest.  First, you should visit the Florida Crime Information Center Website. This site allows you to search for active warrants under your name. Unfortunately, the information is not always up to date so it is important you take additional steps to confirm. If your name does not come up on their database, you should search the Clerk of Court website of the County where you believe you have a warrant. For example, you can search the Miami-Dade County website, Broward County website, and Palm Beach County website. If your name still does not come up, you can also call the courthouse directly and ask a clerk for help.  For your convenience, we have listed some of the numbers here: Miami-Dade County Clerk of Courts: 305-275-1111Broward County Clerk of Courts: 954-831-6565Palm Beach County Clerk of Courts: 561-355-2994For additional Counties, click here. A Florida Criminal Defense Attorney Can Help You Whether you have an active bench warrant out for your arrest or you have been charged with a crime in Florida, it is important you contact an criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. At TicketFit, our criminal defense lawyer has the experience necessary to lift your warrant fast. In addition, he can help you avoid or minimize the severe consequences of the underlying criminal charge. Don’t delay, call us now at (305) 775-3720 or email us for a free consultation!

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How do I check if I have a warrant in Florida? – Action Plus

How do I check if I have a warrant in Florida?Suspect a warrant out for your arrest? Contact us immediately and we can verify if the warrant is active. If so, we can do what is called a walk-through. This could prevent you from having to be arrested and booked.Law enforcement officers have left a card in your door, or you heard that they came looking for you at work or contacted relatives. You may have a warrant out for your arrest, but perhaps they may just be trying to serve you with a subpoena or question you about something you may have witnessed. Unfortunately, if they do have a warrant for your arrest, you could lose your job, upset your family and cause you no small amount of embarrassment in front of your co-workers or neighbors.Contact us immediately! We can verify a warrant and help you avoid arrest by doing a walk-through.Other Benefits of a Walk Through.You will not be handcuffed or have to wait hours before being transported to jail.Avoid having to change into jail clothing or experience an intimate body search.Not face questioning or being tricked into saying something you will later regret.Wait endlessly to be released after a loved one posts bail.Search OnlineYou could find out for yourself if you have a warrant by checking the court records online. Unfortunately, this will only reveal a warrant for missing court. However, this will not show a warrant for a violation of probation or failure to comply. Nor will list arrest warrants for pending charges.What about Contacting the Sheriff’s Department?Contacting the sheriff online or showing up in person will result in being promptly arrested. If you go to the Clerk of the Court, they will also notify a deputy who will take you into custody.Action Plus Is Here to HelpWe know that it can be unsettling to believe that you have an arrest warrant. It might even induce panic in some people. However, making hasty judgments in these circumstances can result in errors that seriously affect the outcome of your case.That is why it is in your best interest to act immediately by contacting your attorney or securing one after posting bail. There are also many other steps that we can recommend to help your situation.You can call Action Plus 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  We have been helping families just like yours for over 32 years.Author: Action Plus Bail Bonds

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Warrants – – Pinellas County Sheriff's Office

Warrants – You may search for wanted persons, missing persons, stolen vehicles, stolen parts, stolen boats, stolen guns and other items by visiting the Florida Department of Law Enforcement website. This search tool does not search for local Pinellas County warrants (such as parking ticket warrants), but it will search for statewide warrants. To visit their website, click HERE. Citizens with questions about a Pinellas County warrant may call the Sheriff’s Office Warrants Desk at 727-582-6192. The Pinellas County Clerk of the Circuit court may also be of assistance at 727-464-7000. The Sheriff’s Violent Offender Warrants Unit proactively searches for persons with warrants for violent crimes. Anyone who has information on suspects wanted for violent crimes can call the Violent Offender Warrants Unit at 727-582-6149. . To supply information on a violent offender, remain anonymous, and be eligible for a cash reward, citizens can: Call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-873-8477 (1-800-873-TIPS) Online Tips: www.crimestoppersofpinellas.org P3 Tips Mobile App

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Florida Warrant Search: Check FL Arrest and Bench Warrants …

Florida Warrant Search: Check FL Arrest and Bench Warrants Online. Florida Warrant Search If an individual has a warrant on them, it indicates a judge has issued a paper allowing police officers the power to arrest the individual so that they can be brought into court. Warrants are usually put out when someone has been charged or found guilty of a criminal offense, owes penalties to the court, or is in contempt of court. Typically, Florida court warrants are used by the police in order to place a suspected criminal in jail and then search their residence for further evidence. There are specific types of court warrants, based on the specific circumstance. Florida Statewide Warrant Search System.Online Warrant Search – http://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Miami-Dade County – MiamiSearch Warrants Online – https://warrants.mdpd.com/SearchWarrants.aspx Broward County – Fort LauderdaleSearch Warrants Using The Clerk Of The Courts Database – https://www.browardclerk.org/Web2 Palm Beach County – West Palm BeachPalm Beach County Sheriff’s Office Warrants Unit3228 Gun Club Road,West Palm Beach, Fl. 33406Tel: (561) 688-3930 Hillsborough County – TampaHCSO Warrant Inquiry Search – https://webapps.hcso.tampa.fl.us/WarrantInquiry Orange County – Orlandohttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Duval County – Jacksonvillehttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Pinellas County – Clearwaterhttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Lee County – Fort MyersOnline Warrant Search – https://www.sheriffleefl.org/how_do_i/learn_more_about/warrants/index.php Polk County – BartowArrest Warrants Online – https://www.polksheriff.org/detention/warrants-inquiry Brevard County – TitusvilleWarrant Search – https://vmatrix1.brevardclerk.us/beca/Warrant_Search.cfm Volusia County – DeLandVCSO Warrant System – https://app02.clerk.org/wrt/inquiry.aspx Pasco County – Dade Cityhttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Seminole County – Sanfordhttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Sarasota County – SarasotaWarrant Search Online – https://www.sarasotasheriff.org/corrections/warrant_search/index.php Marion County – Ocalahttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Collier County – East NaplesSearch CCSO Warrants Database – http://www2.colliersheriff.org/arrestsearch/ Manatee County – Bradentonhttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Lake County – Tavareshttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Escambia County – Pensacolahttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf St Lucie County – Fort PierceWarrant UnitPhysical Address:218 S 2nd Street Room B214 Fort Pierce, FL 34950772-462-3330 Leon County – TallahasseeWarrant Search – http://www.leoncountyso.com/departments/judicial-services/warrant-search Osceola County – Kissimmeehttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Alachua County – Gainesvillehttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf St. Johns County – St. AugustineAccess Search Wanted Tool – http://www.sjso.org/i-want-to/search-wanted/ Clay County – Green Cove SpringsThe Clay County Sheriff’s Office does not include active warrant information on this website. Deputies and staff do not discuss active warrants over the phone. If you need to find out if you have an active warrant, please go in person to our headquarters or any operations center with your photo ID. Okaloosa County – CrestviewOutstanding Warrants – https://www.sheriff-okaloosa.org/warrants/ Hernando County – BrooksvilleLocal Warrants Report – https://www.hernandosheriff.org/applications/records/localwarrants.aspx Bay County – Panama Cityhttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Charlotte County – Punta Gordahttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Santa Rosa County – Miltonhttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Martin County – Stuarthttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Citrus County – Invernesshttp://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/restricted/PAS/person/WantedPersons.jsf Indian River County – Vero BeachWarrants Search – https://ircsheriff.org/warrants-search Florida Arrest Warrant To make an arrest, a police officer needs one of two things, probable cause or an arrest warrant. An arrest warrant is given by a judge or another magistrate. The judge ought to figure out there is sufficient cause for that arrest, based on law enforcement testimony. A Florida arrest warrant will need to particularly name the person to be arrested and could be nullified if law enforcement is found to have given a false statement. Arrest warrants in many cases are given to arrest a suspect within a private dwelling in a non-emergency circumstance. Florida Bench Warrant Courtroom times are necessary to observe and keep, and not appearing at court may result in the court issuing a bench warrant. Quite often, these types of warrants involve insignificant offenses like traffic tickets or otherwise not following court requests. Florida bench warrants obtained their names literally, as…

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