Best Paver Sealer For Florida: How To Keep Your Pavers Looking New – The Paver Sealer Store

If you’ve been looking at paver sealers, you know that they come in a nearly infinite number of different varieties. Not only are there different finishes to think about, you also have the option of using water-based paver sealer or solvent-based. What’s the difference between the two? And is one or the other better if…



If you’ve
been looking at paver sealers, you know that they come in a nearly infinite
number of different varieties. Not only are there different finishes to think
about, you also have the option of using water-based paver sealer or
solvent-based. What’s the difference between the two? And is one or the other
better if your live in the Sunshine State? What is the best paver sealer for
Florida residents?

What are
solvent-based paver sealers?

Solvent-based
paver sealers are normally made up of an acrylic polymer blend that includes
different quantities of solid material in them. 
This varying amount of solid determines how thick or thin the sealer is.
Although solvent-based paver sealer performs similarly to water-based sealers,
it normally offers a thicker coat that leaves a higher gloss to your pavers.
Generally, solvent-based sealers are more difficult to apply, creating more
problems and forcing you to deal with issues that you wouldn’t have with a
water-based sealer.

In addition,
solvent-based sealers tend to have a stronger smell and require a
well-ventilated area during application. They also do better when they’re
rolled on rather than being sprayed since they’re so much thicker than water-based
sealers.

Finally, if
solvent-based sealers aren’t applied correctly, moisture can become trapped
inside and your pavers can end up with unwanted, washed-out colors.

Although
solvent-based sealers have their place, we generally recommend a water-based
paver sealer for Florida residents.

What are
water-based paver sealers?

Like
solvent-based sealers, water-based sealers also include acrylic polymers. The
difference between the two is the way that those polymers are distributed. As
their name implies, water-based sealers disperse their polymers using water
molecules. This creates a mixture that’s much thinner and more easily applied.

Water-based
sealers can be laid down with a sprayer – even an ordinary garden sprayer that
you might normally use for fertilizer. And since the consistency isn’t so
thick, water-based sealers also tend to offer coverage that’s more uniform. You
won’t have to worry about spreading out thick spots since the watery sealer
tends to spread on its own.

After you
apply this kind of sealer, the water will evaporate, leaving the acrylic
polymers to lock and seal your pavers, protecting them from stains, unwanted
vegetation, and undesirable movement.

In addition
to a simpler application, water-based sealers also fade more gradually, don’t
have the strong odors associated with solvent-based sealers, and won’t trap
moisture.

After years of experience in the industry, we believe that the best paver sealer for Florida residents is a water-based sealer. It’s easier to apply, less likely to have problems, and lasts just as long. Unless you have very specific reasons for wanting to use a solvent-based sealer, we recommend a water-based one. And if you’d like more information about water-based paver sealers and why we think they’re a better option, check out this article.

Check out our water based sealers here!

FAQs

Should you seal pavers in Florida?

If you have pavers in your Florida, then it is important to keep them looking their best by sealing them every few years. A good paver sealer will protect the pavers from fading, staining, and cracking.

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How long does paver sealer last in Florida?

3-5 years

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How much does it cost to seal brick pavers in Florida?

Meanwhile, in Florida, the paver sealing cost per square foot tends to hover around $1.50. If you’d like to get a more detailed estimate, you can use this calculator. So, keep all of these things in mind as you look for someone to seal your pavers!Mar 3, 2020

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How do you maintain pavers in Florida?

Cleaning Patio Pavers: 10 Tips for Caring for Your Patio

  1. Sweep Pavers Regularly. …
  2. Use a Paver Sealer. …
  3. Spot Clean Stubborn Stains. …
  4. Replace Broken or Stained Pavers. …
  5. Rinse-Off Pavers with Water. …
  6. Use Polymeric Sand. …
  7. Use a Natural Solution to Kill Weeds. …
  8. Get the Pop in Color Again.

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Part of a video titled How to Seal Pavers | DIY Made Easy | Adbri Masonry – YouTube

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How often reseal pavers Florida?

Sunny Florida Weather and Pavers

If you’re in sunny Florida, congratulations, you don’t need to worry about sealing your pavers too often, but as a rule of thumb, you should always apply a fresh coat of sealant at least every 3 ? 5 years.

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Can I seal my pavers myself?

Before you can seal the pavers, you have to thoroughly clean the surface of all dirt, oil, grease, paint, efflorescence, and previous sealers that might interfere.

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Can I seal my pavers myself?

Pressure washing concrete pavers, especially newer ones, can easily damage the surface finish and we strongly suggest not pressure washing unless you are highly experienced and have the right equipment to pressure wash pavers. In most cases, to get pavers clean with a pressure washer it requires using a jet style tip.

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Should you sand before sealing pavers?

Brick pavers absolutely, 100% need to be re-sanded prior to sealing. The sand in the brick paver joints serves MANY integral purposes. Keeps joints stable, pavers level,and fills the void between pavers to keep them from becoming loose and wobbly.

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How long does paver sealer last?

How often do I need to reseal my pavers? If your sealant has been applied correctly by a professional, it should last between two to three years. The care given to the area and other elements like traffic or weather will also play a part in its longevity.

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Can I seal my pavers myself?

Pavers that aren’t sealed will be more likely to grow weeds in the joints, they will fade and loose their color from wear and UV breakdown, and because most newer paver sealers include an additive that will harden the joint sand it is less likely that you will have settling or shifting caused by joint sand loss.

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Why you shouldn’t seal your pavers?

If you don’t seal your pavers, they won’t deteriorate and wither away. You will just likely have to clean your pavers more frequently and the stains will be harder and in some cases impossible to remove.

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Best Paver Sealer For Florida: How To Keep Your Pavers …

Best Paver Sealer For Florida: How To Keep Your Pavers Looking New – The Paver Sealer StoreIf you have pavers in your Florida, then it is important to keep them looking their best by sealing them every few years. A good paver sealer will protect the pavers from fading, staining, and cracking. There are many different sealers on the market, so how do you know which one is the best paver sealer for Florida? In this article, we will discuss the best paver sealer for Florida and how to choose the right one for your needs.Read The Ultimate Guide to Concrete Paver Sealer and Sealing Brick PaversWhat is a paver sealer and what does it do for pavers?A paver sealer is a product that helps to protect pavers from the elements and everyday wear and tear. It is applied to the surface of the paver, creating a barrier that repels water, dirt, and other debris. Paver sealers also help to enhance the color of the pavers, making them look newer for longer.Paver sealers come in both clear and tinted varieties; Many people prefer the latter option as it can really make the colors “pop.” There are many different brands and types of paver sealers and paver sealants on the market, so it’s important to do your research before choosing one. The Paver Sealer Store is a great resource for learning about different products and finding the best paver sealer for Florida that will suit your needs.How to apply The Best paver sealer for florida and achieve the best resultsPaver sealer is the best way to protect your Florida pavers from the elements. It will also make them last longer and look better. Applying sealer is not difficult, but there are a few things you need to know to do it right.The first thing to understand is that there are two types of paver sealers: water-based and solvent-based. Water-based sealers are less toxic and easier to apply, but they don’t last as long as solvent-based sealers.Solvent-based sealers provide superior protection from stains and weathering, but they can be more difficult to apply and have a stronger odor and can white out or haze, and are becoming increasingly difficult to get due to the high VOC content.If you choose a water-based paver sealer, you will need to apply it with a pump sprayer. If you choose a solvent-based paver sealer, you can apply it with a brush, roller, or pump sprayer. Whichever type of sealer you choose, make sure to read the manufacturer’s instructions carefully before applying it.What are some of the best paver sealers on the market today for Florida homeowners?When it comes to sealing pavers in Florida, there are three products that stand out above the rest – SealThane, Paver Seal RX and Seal RX Enhance. All three of these products are designed to resist the harsh UV rays and heat that can cause pavers to fade and wear down over time.SealThane is a wet look paver sealer that penetrates deep into the pores of the pavers, deeply enhancing the color, and providing long-lasting protection against staining and weathering. Paver seal RX is a clear sealer that deeply enhances the colors and that gives pavers a wet look, bringing out the natural colors and vibrancy of the stone. And finally, Seal RX Enhance is a penetrating sealer that will seep into the paver’s surface, forming long-lasting protection against fading and staining.All three of these products are available at The Paver Sealer Store and can be applied with a pump sprayer.How often should you seal your pavers to keep them looking new and freshPaver sealing is one of the most important things you can do to maintain the beauty and integrity of your pavers. But how often should you seal them? The answer may surprise you.Most experts…

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Paver Sealer in Florida and why it turns white

Paver Sealer in Florida and Why it Turns White Paver Sealer in Florida In all the markets/cities/states that we clean and seal pavers in, Florida by far takes the cake when it comes to bad seal jobs that we come across. At least 50% of our business in Florida is removing failed paver sealers and re-doing the job correctly. The homeowner of this paver driveway in Port St Lucie, FL didn’t even know his pavers had green color in them. The sealer had delaminated from the paver surface which casted a white haze over all the pavers. We steam stripped the sealer, re-sanded the joints and then sealed with our paver sealer and the end results couldn’t be better. There are typically 2 reasons why sealer jobs go bad, and it can take anywhere from 1 day to several years before you can tell its bad. Bad Paver Sealer in Florida Probably the number one cause of failed paver sealer jobs in Florida is poor sealer selection. As you know, Florida has a high humidity level and also a high water table level. This means there is constantly moisture on the surface and moisture trying to escape from the ground. Most of the sealers used in Florida are solvent based sealers which are designed to keep water and moisture out. The problem is, they also keep water and moisture trapped in the paver. This moisture and water will begin deteriorating the bond that the sealer has with the paver and when this happens your sealer turns a white color. Notice how the sealer has turned white. This is because this sealer has detached from the paver and there is water trapped between the sealer and paver. Once this happens, the sealer pretty much needs to be stripped. Our paver sealer at Perfect Paver Co is specially designed to work with the environment to allow the natural flow of moisture in and out of pavers. We are able to achieve this by using H2O (water) in place of the solvent based ingredients in our sealers. As the sealer cures, the water evaporates from our sealer leaving microscopic channels that allow moisture to flow in and out. The term ‘sealing pavers’ is often compared to sealing a deck or sealing a basement where the goal is to keep water out. When it comes to pavers, thats not the goal. Pavers should be sealed regularly to prevent the surface of the paver from deteriorating from traffic, UV rays and rain. Exposure to these three events cause the finer materials in the surface of your paver to wear away leaving only the larger aggregates. The finer materials at the top of the paver is where all the color of your paver is held because  the larger aggregate won’t absorb the color. This picture does a great job of showing this wear. The pavers on the left have been sealed and the pavers on the right have not. Notice how the pavers on the right have started to loose the finer aggregate exposing the larger, colorless aggregate in the surface of the paver. There are many other benefits of sealing pavers, but those benefits vary depending on the type of sealer being used. Bad Paver Sealer Application The second most common cause for failed paver sealer is due to improper application. Unlike any of the other markets/cities/states we provide paver cleaning and paver sealing in, Florida has more unexperienced companies offering paver sealing services than any of the others combined. In Florida, sealing pavers is one of the few trades or services a company can provide without needing a contractor license. So naturally, this industry attracts unskilled and unexperienced startups due to the ease of getting started (Getting a contractor license in the State of Florida can be very difficult). Most bad paver sealer jobs start with poor surface preparation. Due to the porosity of concrete pavers, dirt and grime can become lodged deep in the pores of the paver. If this dirt is not removed prior to sealing, it will prevent the sealer from fully…

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What is the Best Paver Sealer for Florida Residents?

What is the Best Paver Sealer for Florida Residents? If you’ve been looking at paver sealers, you know that they come in a nearly infinite number of different varieties. Not only are there different finishes to think about, you also have the option of using water-based paver sealer or solvent-based. What’s the difference between the two? And is one or the other better if your live in the Sunshine State? What is the best paver sealer for Florida residents? What are solvent-based paver sealers? Solvent-based paver sealers are normally made up of an acrylic polymer blend that includes different quantities of solid material in them.  This varying amount of solid determines how thick or thin the sealer is. Although solvent-based paver sealer performs similarly to water-based sealers, it normally offers a thicker coat that leaves a higher gloss to your pavers. Generally, solvent-based sealers are more difficult to apply, creating more problems and forcing you to deal with issues that you wouldn’t have with a water-based sealer. In addition, solvent-based sealers tend to have a stronger smell and require a well-ventilated area during application. They also do better when they’re rolled on rather than being sprayed since they’re so much thicker than water-based sealers. Finally, if solvent-based sealers aren’t applied correctly, moisture can become trapped inside and your pavers can end up with unwanted, washed-out colors. Although solvent-based sealers have their place, we generally recommend a water-based paver sealer for Florida residents. What are water-based paver sealers? Like solvent-based sealers, water-based sealers also include acrylic polymers. The difference between the two is the way that those polymers are distributed. As their name implies, water-based sealers disperse their polymers using water molecules. This creates a mixture that’s much thinner and more easily applied. Water-based sealers can be laid down with a sprayer – even an ordinary garden sprayer that you might normally use for fertilizer. And since the consistency isn’t so thick, water-based sealers also tend to offer coverage that’s more uniform. You won’t have to worry about spreading out thick spots since the watery sealer tends to spread on its own. After you apply this kind of sealer, the water will evaporate, leaving the acrylic polymers to lock and seal your pavers, protecting them from stains, unwanted vegetation, and undesirable movement. In addition to a simpler application, water-based sealers also fade more gradually, don’t have the strong odors associated with solvent-based sealers, and won’t trap moisture. After years of experience in the industry, we believe that the best paver sealer for Florida residents is a water-based sealer. It’s easier to apply, less likely to have problems, and lasts just as long. Unless you have very specific reasons for wanting to use a solvent-based sealer, we recommend a water-based one. And if you’d like more information about water-based paver sealers and why we think they’re a better option, check out this article. Check out our water based sealers here!

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Stripping off failed paver sealant in Florida

Paver Sealing How To

Paver Sealing How To- Paver Sealing Florida Paver Sealing Florida brings over a decade of hands-on experience to every project. Our job is to get your brick pavers as clean as possible, and that starts with using the right equipment. Our commercial-grade power washing equipment helps get the dirty work done, and reduces the need for harmful chemicals. Beginning the cleaning process starts with a visual inspection of the paver deck and noting problem areas that may need extra attention during the washing process.  How We Clean Your Pavers 1. To clean the paver area, we begin using a commercial grade surface cleaner that has a rotating bar with 2 spray tips. This operates at 3500-4000 psi and will thoroughly scrub the pavers and paver joints without causing damage. We then “cross wash” the paver area again, so it gets “double scrubbed” to ensure they’re clean, and to help remove algae buildup or dirty sand between the paver joints. 2. We then use a wand to pressure wash around all edges, corners, columns, etc. Pool areas also get detailed around the pool screen, pool coping, hot tubs, and other water features. The wand helps remove paint spots, mortar, grease, and more from the surface of your pavers. Rinsing The Paver Area 3. After the washing process, we thouroughly rinse all dirt and debris from the paver area. Flusing the mold and algae from the paver joints is a key part of the rinsing process. Once the pavers are cleaned and rinsed thoroughly, we can then see the actual condition of the pavers, remove additional stains, etc. Algaecide Deep Treatment Some paver systems need our exclusive algaecide deep treatment where the paver joints are flooded with our algaecide/ sodium hypochlorite mixture and allowed to dwell, which will help kill additional mold and weeds between paver joints and under the paver system. This is particularly important step with older paver systems, and thin paver systems that are laid over concrete. After the appropriate dwell time, we then rinse all pavers again before beginning the resanding process. Resanding The Paver Joints 4. Resanding the paver joints is a very important step in the restoration process, as the sand provides the stability of your entire paver system. We use a coarse-grained, washed silica sand and fill to within approximately 1/8″ of the paver edge using the “wet sanding” method. Wet sanding is betther than sweeping because the wet sand settles to the lowest point and allows us to fill all paver joints properly and rinse away the excess. 5. Once the sanding of the paver joints is complete, we use a blower to blow any excess sand off the pavers before applying the sealer. Applying The Sealer- Flood Coat 6. The first coat of sealer to be applied in our sealing process is called a “flood coat”. The paver joints and surface of the pavers are actually flooded with sealer to ensure the sand absorbs the sealer, and that the paver itself gets soaked to create the barrier between your pavers and the elements. Getting the sealer deep into the paver helps bring out the true colors of your paver system, and keep them there. Flooding the paver joints locks in the sand, and will help prevent lots of problems with your paver system in the future. Applying The 2nd Coat of Sealer 7. A second and third coat, or “top coats” of sealer is also applied to help form the protective barrier your pavers need, and to deliver more sealer to the paver joints. The 2nd coat adds another layer of protection helps give your paver system a hint of shine without becoming slippery or too shiny. After the sealer fully cures, the sand will be fully locked into…

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Should you have brick pavers sealed right after installation?

Should you have brick pavers sealed right after installation?DO NOT SEAL PAVERS SOONER THAN 2 (two) WEEKS AFTER INSTALL IN FLORIDA! Sealing your newly installed brick pavers prior to them having the opportunity to release any efflorescence that may be within each individual brick paver, that paver sealant can prevent the calcium carbonate to evaporate into the air, and the sealer will trap that white haze into the pavers. Leaving you with a very unsightly mess which will now require a costly stripping of the new sealant, chemical removal of the efflorescence, and correct re-seal using a high quality, commercial grade brick paver sealant like UreSeal H2o Most reputable brick paver installation companies know about the efflorescence process, but will still offer brick paver sealing services in order to put a few hundred more dollars into their pockets. We have had our customers tell us that once the efflorescence was trapped under the sealer, brick paver installation companies will tell the home owner that it is a natural process and they are not responsible for the efflorescence and it is not covered under warranty. However, often times, the brick paver manufacturers who abide by ICPI (Interlocking Concrete Pavement Institute, www.icpi.org) standards will offer free replacement paves for each individual brick paver effected by this process. Which will also benefit the paver installer who now will charge you to remove the effected pavers, and install new. Costing the home owner more money. Don’t get me wrong, your brick pavers need to be sealed! You just want to wait between 4 & 6 weeks after install (in Florida) before you have them sealed. The reason why it is different in central and south Florida (draw a line between Citrus county and Daytona Beach and everywhere south from there) is because of our subtropical climate. Our climate in these areas have a lot of ground moisture which permeates through the soil, and into the brick pavers from the bottom. As the brick pavers heat up throughout the morning and hot afternoon and that moisture evaporates out of the pavers, it draws that efflorescence out along with it much quicker than in states further north, where you may have to wait up to 3 months before sealing. If the brick pavers do go un-sealed however, aside from cosmetic issues and possible staining and absorption of oils and rust, your new brick paver installation will quickly become loose, wobbly and uneven as the aggregate material that the brick pavers float on erodes out through a process called “degradation” or “Sub Surface For your expert brick paver sealing company, give us a call at the main office at 727-218-4221 or, for the fastest response, submit an online request for an estimate by clicking this link. Brick paver sealing in Pasco, Hernando, Hillsborough, Bradenton, Sarasota, Orlando, Citrus county, The Villages and all surrounding Tampa Florida areas.#efflorescence #efflorescenceremove #efflorescenceinpavers #brickpaverefflorescence #paversealing

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How to Seal Pavers: 11 Steps (with Pictures) – wikiHow

How to Seal Pavers: 11 Steps (with Pictures) – wikiHow Download Article Download Article Pavers may be brick, natural cut stone, or some other rock product and are commonly used to create paths, driveways, or patios. To make them last longer and look great, it’s a good idea to seal them. The process involves choosing the right sealer for your stone and to achieve your purpose in sealing the pavers. You should always wash paved areas first and level any crooked pavers. Sealer is usually applied with a sprayer or roller and it’s important to get all of the pavers covered evenly. 1 Choose a water-based sealer if your pavers are laid with joint sand. Water-based sealers are sprayed on and give an even coverage. The main benefit of a water-based sealer is that it hardens the joint sand and penetrates into pavers better. This ends up creating a hard seal over the entire paved area.[1] Water-based sealers do not darken the stones or give a high amount of shine to the pavers. Choose this sealer for bricks that are porous and won’t shine much anyway. If you are unsure what type of pavers you have or you aren’t sure which sealer is best, consult a home improvement store employee. Water-based sealers often require that you apply more than one coat to the paved area. 2 Buy a solvent sealer to darken stones and make them shine. Solvent sealers can give a much higher gloss to the stones than water-based sealers. The downside is that they do not harden sand as effectively. This sealer is great for smooth, non-porous stones. If your pavers are laid tightly together without joint sand, this is a good option. Solvent sealers are often thicker than water-based sealers, so you may be required to use a roller rather than a sprayer. Advertisement 3 Read the instructions for proper application. Sealers may be sprayed on with a pump sprayer, laid with a nap roller, or a combination of both. Follow the instructions on the sealer you buy to use the proper tools.[2] Thin sealers can often be sprayed on, which is much faster. Thicker sealers may need to be rolled, which can be slower and won’t always cover as evenly. Some sealers are sprayed on but require that you backroll the pavers to even out the coating. 4 Use a sprayer with an adjustable nozzle head. For best application, you want a nice wide fan spray, so be sure that the sprayer you use has either multiple head attachments or an adjustable spray pattern. Never use a sprayer that shoots a narrow stream.[3] A bug sprayer is a good option for this. They are widely available at hardware stores, and they are often inexpensive. 5 Use a roller of appropriate thickness. Many sealers will require that you lay them with a roller rather than a sprayer, and in this case it is important that the roller is thick enough. The sealer will most likely give you instructions about this. For example, one sealer might suggest a roller with a 1″ thick nap.[4] This is important because if the roller is not thick enough, the sealer will not get down into the cracks between the…

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